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ARTISTRY ON STAGE

| brittany@yesweekly.com

Don’t get in the car with strangers. It’s the number one rule that we have all heard our parents say at least a hundred times during our childhood.

Bradley Tuggle got into a car with a stranger once. That particular stranger wanted to change Tuggle’s life.

“I saw Farouk Shami at a hairshow, and he saw that I was drawing a crowd to a pretty small stage,” Tuggle said. “So on our way out, Farouk told me to get in the limo with him to drive to the airport.”

It was in that limo that Farouk Shami, owner of perhaps the most recognizable and profitable names in hair care, offered Tuggle a try-out to be a CHI stage artist.

Tuggle nailed the try-out in Houston, and he has been working for the company ever since.

Hairstylists are artists, and their canvases are people. Tuggle has the task of being an artist on a bigger stage. His role as stage artist requires him to not only be entertaining, but to also be informative and persuasive. Working for a company as popular as CHI means that Tuggle has to be on stage, performing as a stylist, to draw in the interest of the crowd.

The live demonstration at shows has to prove to the crowd that CHI products are the best.

“Working for CHI at hair shows is basically like being in the Major League of hair,” Tuggle said.

Tuggle, the 37-year old Greensboro native, is also the proud owner of the city’s eco-friendly salon, Boho Salon, located in downtown. He has owned the salon for over three years, and despite his hectic schedule, he can be found working at the salon two days a week.

“I probably spend, on average, about 16 weekends a year on the road,” Tuggle said. “It’s always in and out of airports, and I’ve been to pretty much every big city in the United States.”

As if his existing workload wasn’t heavy enough, Tuggle was recently given the opportunity to sell CHI products to an even larger market: the QVC market.

It was this opportunity that made Tuggle emotional.

“My mother was an avid QVC watcher,” Tuggle said. “It seemed like every time I would walk into the house, she would have it on.”

Tuggle’s mother passed away a year before his first segment on QVC, but he knows that she was somewhere, watching over him, with a big smile on her face.

“I accomplished my mother’s dream, and all I wanted to do afterwards was call her,” Tuggle said. “It was the biggest goal I could have accomplished to make her proud. She was my world.”

Tuggle explains the QVC atmosphere as an “intense” environment. The headquarters is based in the borough of West Chester, Pa., and Tuggle said that the building and ambiance are both magnificent.

“It’s all live, so you have to be on your A-game the entire time,” Tuggle said. “No room for errors.”

His first segment on the show lasted 13 minutes, and because it was so successful, he was given 18 minutes for his second segment.

During the segments, Tuggle performs demonstrations on hair using only products from the CHI line. He performs a similar act on stage at hair shows where he demonstrates anything from scissors to blow-dryers. Because everything that Tuggle does is live and he must maintain the respected integrity of the CHI brand, his demonstrations, both on TV and at hair shows, must always be on point.

Both of Tuggle’s segments on the QVC channel brought in more than $1 million in sales, and he has been invited back to do two more shows with the network; one in August and another in October.

Through his work at both hair shows and QVC, Tuggle has become a well-respected figure in the hair industry, and he is proud of his accomplishments and humbled by his journey.

“A lot of people want to be a big fish in a little pond,” Tuggle said. “But I always wanted to big a big fish in a big pond.” !

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