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City plans Summit Avenue realignment

by Jeff Sykes

Summit Avenue realignment at Davie Street.

Minor adjustments to a busy intersection could enhance the flow of traffic and pedestrians in the area between the future LeBauer Park and the Tanger Center for the Performing Arts.

City planners received the green light from Greensboro’s City Council to realign the intersection of Summit Avenue and Davie Street, improving the angular intersection into a more traditional 90-degree T-shape.

Assistant City Manager David Parrish presented the plan to council at its work session on Tuesday. The plans will add an additional turn lane at each approach and improve pedestrian crossways in three places.

In an interview Thursday, Parrish said that city staff realized that with the amount of pending work in that area, there was an opportunity to address longstanding concerns with that intersection’s limited functionality. With a large increase in pedestrian traffic expected when the park and the PAC are finished, making a more natural intersection part of the construction plans seemed obvious.

The street realignment will cost about $2.4 million, according to estimates provided to city council. The Summit Ave work will run $1.5 million and involve the primary street realignment. About $200,000 will be spent to improve pedestrian access on Davie Street, with another $700,000 being spend on landscaping, lighting and other streetscape enhancements.

The design plans for the intersection will be made part of the construction contract for LeBauer Park, Parrish said. The contract is expected to be finalized by the end of the year.

LeBauer Park will be built on a 3.3 acre site along Davie Street, just north of the Cultural Center on the site of the current Festival Park. The park is named for Carolyn Weill LeBauer, who left her estate to the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro when she passed away in 2012. LeBauer directed that her estate be used “for the creation of a public park for the benefit and enjoyment of the general population of Greensboro, particularly children and their families.”

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