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by Jordan Green

Items from across the Triad and beyond

JOEL NAME TO STAY ON MARQUEE AND FAÇADE OF COLISEUM

Wake Forest University has agreed to retain the name “Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial” on the coliseum, the city of Winston-Salem announced in a press release that went out just before the close of business on Friday, May 10. The university had earlier insisted that any potential transaction would have to include lucrative naming rights, although officials had agreed to keep intact a plaza memorial and exhibit in the lobby honoring Joel and all military veterans. The new agreement ensures that Joel’s name will remain on the marquee and façade of the coliseum.

The late Lawrence Joel was an Army medic who saved more than 13 soldiers’ lives by administering aid during a 24-hour fight in the remote Vietnamese province of Bien Hoa in 1965. For his acts of valor he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor by President Lyndon Johnson in 1967.

Mayor Pro Tem Vivian Burke, who was part of the council majority that voted to name the coliseum after Joel in 1986, took satisfaction in the decision.

“I have made it clear that the city’s commitment to addressing concerns about how Mr. Joel will be recognized was unwavering and would not be compromised,” she said in a prepared statement.

“I am pleased our voice has been heard.”

PARMON SEEKS HELP TO GET MINIMUM WAGE BILL OFF DEATH ROW

NC Sen. Earline Parmon (D-Forsyth) is circulating a petition among her fellow Senate members to bring a bill she filed in March to index minimum wage to inflation up for consideration. One day after the bill was filed by the Democratic lawmaker, it was referred to the Committee on Rules and Operations of the Senate, chaired by Sen. Tom Apodaca (R-Henderson) — a fate colloquial known as “death row.”

The committee chair typically determines whether a bill can be placed on the calendar for consideration, but Senate rules hold that if a member is able to obtain signatures from two thirds of the body — or 30 members — the bill can be heard without approval from the chair.

“The wages for working people have not kept up with inflation or corporate presidents,” Parmon said in a prepared statement. “This is a working-people’s bill.”

To move the bill forward over the objections of the Senate leadership, Parmon would need signatures from at least 12 republican lawmakers to reach the required threshold.

No word on Monday on Parmon’s progress on that difficult proposition.

I am pleased our voice has been heard.’

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