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by Kaitlyn McBride

10 BEST ST. PATRICK’S DAY CLICHÉS

RANDOMLY COMPILED

WEAR GREEN

Ireland is often referred to as the “Emerald Isle,” a nickname inspired by the natural abundant greenery found there. Green is representative of spring, the shamrock, hope and nature, and is found in the country’s flag. Sporting an emerald-hued accessory is critical to avoid falling victim to the next cliché.

PINCH PEOPLE NOT WEARING GREEN

In the 1700s, people thought wearing green made you invisible to leprechauns, devious little Irish fairies. Since it was believed they would pinch anyone they could see, pinching those who forgot their green was a reminder of the sneaky little creatures. Don’t be afraid to reach out and pinch someone who isn’t wearing green while you’re celebrating. If he isn’t wearing green you can always pretend you didn’t see it.

DRESS UP AS A LEPRECHAUN

Leprechauns are a type of Irish fairy that assume the form of little old men in green clothes and buckle hats. They spend their free time making shoes (and mischief), storing all their coins in pots hidden at the ends of rainbows. Running around, causing trouble and collecting money for shoemaking… who wouldn’t want to be a leprechaun? You could settle for a green sweatsuit, and maybe sip a Guinness from a tiny black pot. No one will notice if you aren’t wearing a hat.

KISS SOMEONE IRISH

A common Irish tradition is to kiss the Blarney Stone, which is the “Stone of Eloquence.” Kissing it is said to grant the kisser the ability never to be lost for words, but a second option is to kiss someone who is Irish. This is the only other choice to get good luck— from a kiss anyway.

DRINK

For a lot of people, this holiday serves as an excuse to falsify Irish descent, kiss someone who claims said descent and, eventually, get drunk. Typically pubs and bars will offer green beers for St. Patty’s Day, so lift them up and drink them down…no one will know you’re not really Irish.

EAT TRADITIONAL IRISH FOOD

Early Irish-American immigrants, who were too poor to afford pork ate corned beef — buying beef brisket and brining it in corn-sized crystals of salt, which explains the name of the dish. It is commonly prepared for the holiday’s celebration in America, but not usually in Ireland. Irish soda bread is also popular, named not for the cola but for the baking soda that adds a unique flavor and texture to the bread.

LISTEN TO BAGPIPES

Bagpipes are not of Irish origin, but rather date back to the early Middle East. It wasn’t until the 14th century that bagpipes reached their highest level of popularity in Ireland and Scotland. The sound of a bagpipe somewhat resembles a cat having its tail slammed in a door. They can be fun to listen to, if only to bring out that inner Irishman that’s (not really) inside you.

WEAR A KILT

What man wouldn’t want an excuse to wear a plaid skirt? I kid. Kilts for men actually originated in Scotland, and the small kilt, also known as a philabeg is essentially today’s modern kilt. But if you do wear one, we must ask… what’s under it?

LOOK FOR FOUR-LEAF CLOVERS

A shamrock is a three-leaf clover. The leaves stand for the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. When a fourth leaf is present, it is said to represent God’s grace. Finding a four-leaf clover is considered good fortune, and the leaves can also represent faith, hope, love and, of course, luck. Real fourleaf clovers will have a telltale inner white ring, quartered by each leaf. The fourth leaf will also, more often than not, appear smaller than the other three.

ATTEND EVERY CRAZY PARTY POSSIBLE

Here in the Triad, we love to celebrate St. Patty’s Day, and have taken the time to compile a list of some of the most anticipated bashes this year. You are oh so welcome, little drunken leprechaun. In Winston-Salem: Fox & Hound (March 15- 17); Finnigan’s Wake (March 16-17); Johnny & June’s (March 16); District Rooftop Bar & Grille (March 16). In Greensboro: Cooper’s Ale House (March 17 ), McCoul’s Public House(March 16-17). In High Point: the Claddagh (March 17).

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