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ryan’s forecast

by Ryan Snyder

upcoming shows you should check out

THE EMBERS STILL BURNING STRONG THIS NEW YEAR’S EVE

For even the most diehard hater of beach music, one thing is for certain: Every man, at some point in his life, will sing out “I Love Beach Music” in a shameless attempt to score points with a woman. For 52 years, the Embers have been providing the soundtrack to goofball dance moves and feigned interests with overly simplistic, often cheesy blue-eyed soul, and this New Year’s Eve, they’ll do it at the Winston-Salem Entertainment Sports Complex. Tickets for the show are $95, which seems like a lot for them, and considering it includes open bar, still seems like a lot. The smart man upgrades to the room packages for $265 or $295, because that room at the Embassy Suites or Marriott will come in handy for the private shag lessons earned by a masterful lip-syncing of “Carolina Girls” after your potential sweetie’s 5 th glass of white zin.

SOUNDLIZZARD PRODUCTIONS PRESENT: RAHEEM N’ NEM

Raheem Kashon is the son to a singer with a nimble voice and a preacher with a gift for ministry. Like both of his parents, he’s also gifted with the ability to tap into spiritual energy through his voice. Using the ministerial and musical qualities passed onto him, Kashon has fashioned those gifts into his own inimitable brand of indie soul steeped in the spiritual. It is channeled through his band, the seven piece Winston-Salem outfit known as Raheem N’ Nem, whose music is soulful and eclectic, with hints of gospel, jazz, R&B, country and folk. They’ll be performing live in Winston-Salem on New Year’s Day as a part of a presentation by up-and-coming label Sound Lizard Productions, with jazz artist Carly Williams on in support. The music starts at 8 p.m. at the Community Arts Café’s Underground Theatre, and tickets are just $5.

JAZZ GREAT PLAYS FREE SHOW IN WINSTON-SALEM

On Jan. 6, the Community Arts Café in Winston-Salem presents a performance featuring one of the most famous jazz drummers you’ve never heard of. Way back in the late ’50’s, Ronnie Free was one of the most sought-after skin men in the sizzling hot New York cool jazz scene. But like so many other musicians of that era, Free nearly destroyed himself with drugs, and eventually fell out of the music scene altogether. Decades later, he’s playing and creating amazing improvisational jazz, this time as a part of the award-winning Jazz Loft Project with author Sam Stephenson. Free will be joined by his trio, Gary Moran on piano and Royce Campbell on bass, before opening the last set to any with the brass to sit in with one of the greats of jazz. The event is free and open to anyone, and begins at 7 pm.

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