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by Jordan Green

WINSTON-SALEM SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE LAUNCHED

A new social networking website for residents of greater Winston-Salem and Forsyth County proposes to make users the collective authors of a community story that prods people to greater civic engagement. At last count, the Bridges website, located at mybridges.net, had six “story loops,” which invite registered users to make entries in response to posed questions, were “Discover What Matters in WS/Forsyth,” “Could you use $1,000?” and “What’s Your Favorite Movie Scene?” As the website explains, the service brings people together “to share wide-ranging ideas and opinions about a variety of topics. Bridges editors then integrate these personal reflections into a unified story, channeling our diverse creative energy into a dynamic community dialogue. In essence, Bridges shapes our collective reflections into a spiraling citizen journal that is constantly evolving.

From these online collaborative story events, Bridges encourages face-to-face gatherings between you and people you’d like to meet, transforming the faceless internet into an exciting bridge to real life.”

Bridges’ board of advisors includes Mayor Allen Joines; Alejandro Martinique, executive editor of Que Pasa Newspapers and Radio; and John Henry Bryan, co-owner of Krankies Coffee. — JG

GREENSBORO SETTLES LAWSUIT WITH SOB

The city of Greensboro has announced a settlement with nightclub operator Darryl McCarroll, who has reportedly agreed to not operate a sexually oriented business in Guilford County for the next seven years, and with landowner Clarence Ray Jernigan, who has agreed to not operate a sexually oriented business on his property at 510 Farragut St. for the next seven years. The city’s public nuisance lawsuit alleged that the location, which variously operated under the names Sugar Bares, Lost Dimensions and Nikita’s, permitted prostitution and created a climate of “recurrent and dangerous criminal activity.” While agreeing to shut down the club, McCarroll and Jernigan admitted no wrongdoing and denied all allegations by the city.— JG

SUSTAINABILITY PROPOSES CASH FLOW ACCOUNT FROM CONSERVATION SAVINGS

Local residents will get a chance to review the Greensboro Community Sustainability Council’s first ever Sustainability Action Plan at an open house on Thursday from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Regency Room, at 203 S. Elm St. The plan is also available for review online at www.greensboro-nc.gov/sustainability. A letter to the city council from the sustainability council’s two co-chairs, Joel Landau and Bob Powell, notes that the city is operating under significant “budget constraints.” “Essential to our overall recommended strategies is the establishment of a Cash Flow Sustainability Account, which would divert 50 percent of operating cost savings from city energyefficiency and conservation projects to fund additional such projects, with the remaining 50 percent allocated to the city’s general budget,” the co-chairs write. “Such an account will provide meaningful reductions in [greenhouse gas] emissions and safeguarding our economy.” — JG

ITEMS TESTED IN SILK PLANT FOREST CASE YIELD NO NEW EVIDENCE

Physical evidence gathered from the crime scene of the 1995 Silk Plant Forest-Jill Marker assault case, which only recently was discovered to have never been tested revealed “no new evidence,” said Winston-Salem Police Chief Scott Cunningham during a press conference Monday. Cunningham said that fibers found on a piece of cardboard were not human hair, as speculated previously, but materials from the store where victim Jill Marker worked. Different sets of hair were found on Marker’s clothing, some of which matched Marker’s DNA profile. “Some of the hairs did reveal enough DNA for us to do some comparisons,” Cunningham said. “These comparisons indicated that the hairs did not match Jill Marker, Kalvin Michael Smith or any other person that’s been involved in this investigation.” — KTB

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